U.S. Government

Chart showing comparing the reported federal deficit to the true federal deficit from 2001 to 2019
 
Click on the chart to view it in more detail. 
*For an explanation of the large deficits, please click here.

TIA Data

2018 Financial State of the Union (Released 4/11/2019)

Use Create Your Own Federal Chart to see additional financial and economic data and rhetorical analysis

 
U.S. Government owes more than it owns.
U.S. Government's Taxpayer Burden™ is $693,000, and received an "F" from TIA.
U.S. Government is a Sinkhole without enough assets to cover its debt.
Elected officials have created a Taxpayer Burden™, which is each taxpayer's share of the government's bills after its available assets have been tapped.
TIA's Taxpayer Burden™ measurement incorporates both assets and liabilities, including unfunded Social Security and Medicare promises.
U.S. Government only has $3.8 trillion of assets available to pay bills totaling $108.9 trillion.
Because U.S. Government doesn't have enough money to pay its bills, it has a $105.1 trillion financial hole. To fill it, each taxpayer would have to send $693,000 to the federal government.
Although the Treasury Department does not include unfunded Social Security and Medicare promises on the federal balance sheet, these liabilities are included in this analysis.
 

Other Resources

Financial Report of the U.S. Government

Publishing Entity: U.S. Department of Treasury

IN THE NEWS
MIA defense spending – a crucial cost of war

NOVEMBER 15, 2019 | THE HILL | by Sarah Wagner

The United States government spends upward of $140 million per year to recover and identify the remains of the 81,000 unaccounted-for service members from World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War and the Persian Gulf War. … Because I have spent the last decade studying the MIA accounting effort, I'm often asked whether I think it's worth pouring all this money and effort into recovering and identifying these war dead. …  It's not a zero-sum game: these efforts make clear the steep human costs of war.

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